510zrzsio4l-_sx385_bo1204203200_In the memoir-like chapbook, “Blossom’s Wine Bar” Frida R. snatches her audience’s hearts and drags them down the unpaved roads of her messy, ever-changing alcohol soaked world.

With fair amounts of wit and grit, “Blossom’s Wine Bar” is a collection of stoems (poems that read like short stories) and personal essays where she pulls readers deeper into her world by revealing the events that pushed her to create such raw art.

Genuine, vulnerable and sometimes crass, Frida R. opens up about abortion, relationships, depression, and suicide. With so many things that have gone wrong, she shares the life lessons and moments of self-awareness that allow her to continuously progress because as she says, “If you aren’t going to continue to grow and change, you’re just a waste of food and resources.”

“Blossom’s Wine Bar” reads like conversations between friends because Frida R. is an author who thrives from the idea of connecting with her audience. She wishes to be a voice to the voiceless and a source of motivation for the underdog, making her the stoet (storyteller & poet) to look out for.

Buy your copy and follow the author, Frida R., on Facebook!

Book | Facebook | Amazon Author Page | Goodreads


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

When she isn’t writing, painting, or experimenting in her kitchen, Frida R. can be found pranking her far too trusting boyfriend. By the time she’d graduated the fifth grade, Frida knew she’d grow up to become a writer after having authored several short stories, songs, and stacks of unsent hate mail to her older brother for messing with her toys.
Today, female empowerment drives Frida’s work. Recklessly raw and unfiltered, she speaks on her struggles with love, depression, and learning to fight for herself. In her debut, “Blossom’s Wine Bar”, Her agenda is clear: Frida fights dirty and hates living in a world where hardworking women are told they aren’t good enough, victims remain victims, and mental health is overlooked. Although, she writes about the darkness we all get trapped in, Frida includes not false hope, but proof of a light that shines at the end of the tunnel.

 

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